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December 09, 2023

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NASA completes key step in aviation safety research

"What we've accomplished with TC-1 is really just beginning to scratch the surface of what's possible," said Kyle Ellis, NASA's project manager for System-Wide Safety. "Developing these systems enables a new economy for aviation uses that will benefit us all in the future."
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NASA completes key step in aviation safety research

by John Gould for NASA News
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 03, 2023
NASA's aeronautical innovators have completed a significant step in their pursuit of safer, more efficient aviation technologies that spot hazards before they occur. Through its System-Wide Safety project, NASA and its partners in government, industry, and academia are exploring new technologies and techniques to improve current aviation safety and potentially enable widespread use of new types of aircraft such as drones or air taxis.

The project recently completed Technical Challenge 1 (TC-1), Terminal Area Risk Management, the first step towards achieving what is known as an In-Time Aviation Safety Management System. This new type of aviation safety technology can effectively address potential hazards expected with the rise in demand for the number and types of aircraft flying in the National Airspace System.

As aviation operations continue to grow in scale and diversity, and with new modes of flight expected to rise in the near future, keeping the skies safe becomes increasingly complex and drives the need to transform the way order is maintained above our communities.

"What we've accomplished with TC-1 is really just beginning to scratch the surface of what's possible," said Kyle Ellis, NASA's project manager for System-Wide Safety. "Developing these systems enables a new economy for aviation uses that will benefit us all in the future."

Planning Ahead
In a busy aviation environment, an In-Time Aviation Safety Management System can efficiently identify and predict safety issues a human would be hard tasked to keep up with.

In today's airspace safety system, let's say an air traffic manager is looking at their screen and guiding 10 airplanes towards their destinations. This person would use a combination of established safety rules and pattern recognition to make sure those aircraft remain a safe distance apart. If this person saw a hazard that posed a safety risk, they would work with the pilots aboard the aircraft and resolve the issue.

Now, let's think about the airspace of tomorrow. Instead of 10 airplanes total, 10 air taxis, 10 ultra-efficient airliners, and 10 commercial supersonic jets might be sharing the same confined airspace. Preventing and addressing hazards would become a more complex issue nearly impossible for a person to identify in time to prevent an accident.

An In-Time Aviation Safety Management System is designed to identify these events much more rapidly than human operators, then quickly deliver actionable safety procedures to prevent the dangerous situation long before it develops.

Furthermore, preventing these situations from ever arising in the first place increases the efficiency of the airspace overall, since not as much time and effort would be spent by managers keeping things running smoothly.

Laying the Foundation
TC-1 contributed several important pieces of technology working towards the development of such a system. These contributions improve aviation safety not just for tomorrow - but also for today.

For example, part of the research included using new machine learning algorithms to analyze data gathered from major airlines, which use existing aviation safety management systems, to discover potential safety risks that had previously been undefined - overall making things safer.

Researchers also gathered information on exact ways human safety managers, pilots, air traffic controllers, and others interact with safety procedures. The team identified useful, efficient practices, as well as those that could potentially lead to safety risks. Their work contributes substantially to improving training and safety operations.

Additionally, researchers studied human performance and fatigue, partnering with pilots to study how various factors such as flight scheduling, certain short-haul routes, and even the COVID-19 pandemic affect operations.

Other results include prototype safety tools and surveys on human performance.

With this more comprehensive understanding of the safety landscape, NASA and its partners can more effectively continue ushering in new safety technologies.

"We focused on gathering data on current-day operations, but always have an eye for the near future," said Nikunj Oza, subproject manager for TC-1. "We can use the lessons learned about current aviation safety to best inform new systems."

ai.spacedaily.com analysis

Relevance Scores:

1. Aerospace Industry Analyst: 8/10
2. Stock and Finance Market Analyst: 5/10
3. Government Policy Analyst: 7/10

Analyst Summary:

From the perspective of an Aerospace Industry Analyst, NASA's completion of the Technical Challenge 1 (TC-1) within its System-Wide Safety project marks a significant stride toward enhancing aviation safety, which is crucial given the anticipated expansion and diversification of air traffic, including the integration of drones and air taxis. The development of an In-Time Aviation Safety Management System promises to address the complexity of future airspace management by quickly identifying and responding to potential hazards, which human operators might miss. This is a considerable interest because it has the potential to alter the landscape of the industry, affecting both existing operations and future technological implementations.

A Stock and Finance Market Analyst would view this advancement with moderate interest, noting that such innovations could lead to long-term efficiency savings for airlines and related industries, which may influence stock valuations and investment opportunities. However, the immediate financial implications may be less clear, hence the mid-range score.

For a Government Policy Analyst, the implications of NASA's research are quite relevant as they pertain to regulatory frameworks, safety standards, and the potential need for legislation surrounding the future of aviation and air traffic management. Government bodies will likely be interested in the progress of such safety systems to guide policy development for a growing and evolving aviation industry.

Comparing this article to events and trends in the aerospace sector over the past 25 years, we observe a continual push towards increasing automation and safety in aviation, with developments such as the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) being milestones in this journey. The focus on machine learning algorithms and advanced predictive analytics represents an evolution of these earlier trends.

Investigative questions analysts might consider include:

1. What specific advancements in machine learning and predictive analytics does TC-1 integrate, and how do they differ from current systems?

2. How will these new technologies integrate with existing air traffic control and management systems?

3. What are the estimated costs and timeframes for implementing these new safety systems on a wide scale?

4. How will this safety system influence the training and roles of human air traffic controllers and pilots?

5. What are the potential barriers to adoption of the In-Time Aviation Safety Management System across different sectors of the industry, including commercial and cargo airlines, private aviation, and emerging air mobility solutions?

In conclusion, NASA's advancements in aviation safety technology represent a fusion of long-standing trends toward increased safety and efficiency in aerospace with modern advancements in machine learning and data analysis. The implications span from industry operations to financial considerations and government policies, signaling a transformation in how the aerospace field manages the ever-growing complexity of air traffic.


Artificial Intelligence Analysis

Objectives:

NASA and its partners have completed the first step in their System Wide Safety project to develop new technologies and techniques to improve current aviation safety and potentially enable widespread use of new types of aircraft such as drones or air taxis.

State of the Art:

The project recently completed Technical Challenge 1 Terminal Area Risk Management which is the first step towards achieving an In Time Aviation Safety Management System. This new type of aviation safety technology can effectively address potential hazards expected with the rise in demand for the number and types of aircraft flying in the National Airspace System.

Whats New:

In a busy aviation environment, an In Time Aviation Safety Management System can efficiently identify and predict safety issues a human would be hard tasked to keep up with. This system will enable a new economy for aviation uses that will benefit us all in the future. Target Audience:

The target audience for this project is the aviation industry, and the impact of success could include improved safety in airspace, as well as potential for widespread use of new types of aircraft such as drones or air taxis.

Risks Involved:

The risks involved in the project may include the inability to develop the technology and/or the system to the point of use, as well as the cost of pursuing such a project.

Cost:

The cost of pursuing this approach may include additional research and development costs, as well as costs associated with potentially developing new types of aircraft.

Timeline:

The timeline for achieving results will depend on the success of the project, as well as the availability of resources.

Success Metrics:

Mid-term and final success metrics will depend on the goals of the project, as well as the availability of resources.

Score: 8/10

This AI report is generated by a sophisticated prompt to a ChatGPT API. Our editors clean text for presentation, but preserve AI thought for our collective observation. Please comment and ask questions about AI use by Spacedaily. We appreciate your support and contribution to better trade news.


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